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Fraction to the Son: "Oh Lamb of God"
  • I was wondering if anyone has any record of the history and origins of this Fraction, located on page 457 of the second edition of the Divine Liturgy book published by the SUS diocese.  It starts with:

    O Lamb of God, who through Your sufferings have borne the sins of the world, blot out our iniquities through Your compassion.

    O only-begotten of God, who through Your Blood have cleansed the filth of the world, cleanse the filth of our souls through Your mercies.

    O Christ of God, who through Your death have slain death that had slain all, by Your power raise up the deadness of our souls.

    ...



    Does anyone know when it first appears in our manuscripts, or who wrote it?

    Thank you
  • Let's bump this again  ;)
  • Mina,
    I have to look at some manuscripts. I don't have any particular history of the origin of this fraction. It is probably one of the only examples of a penial substitution/Anslem theology in the Coptic Church.

    It is a nice fraction but I have problems with the language style in it. It doesn't seem Coptic because of the liturgical terminologies it uses.

    I'll get back to you on this.
  • I'm not sure if I see a theological or soteriological problem with this fraction. It's beautiful in its yearning for the savior who is the redeemer of all through his life giving sacrifice.

    It's important to remember that just because the fraction isn't infused with rich theological expressions or ideas it doesn't mean it's denying or negating them. It's a simple contemplative fraction which appears to be written by a simple monk/layman who merely modeled it along those verses here or others like them:

    1Peter2.24
    Who his own self bare our sins in his own body on the tree, that we, being dead to sins, should live unto righteousness: by whose stripes ye were healed.

    1Cor15.3
    For I delivered unto you first of all that which I also received, how that Christ died for our sins according to the scriptures

    Titus 2.14
    who gave Himself for us, that He might redeem us from every lawless deed and purify for Himself His own special people, zealous for good works.

    I don't believe it's endorsing penal substitution. It's a simple prayer and perhaps we should take it at that.






  • [quote author=Remnkemi link=topic=14279.msg163559#msg163559 date=1361995436]
    Mina,
    I have to look at some manuscripts. I don't have any particular history of the origin of this fraction. It is probably one of the only examples of a penial substitution/Anslem theology in the Coptic Church.

    It is a nice fraction but I have problems with the language style in it. It doesn't seem Coptic because of the liturgical terminologies it uses.

    I'll get back to you on this.


    Hi Rem,

    No, not at all.  I think you're confusing this with the Fraction to the Son on page 467, where it begins with "O Only-begotten Son, God, the Logos, who loved us, and through His love, He desired to redeem us from eternal perdition. ..."

    No, the one on page 457 is actually a very beautiful one.  It's a Fraction of theosis, or deification more than anything, and I was just interested because of the clarity of its language.  It's a long fraction, so I didn't want to type the whole thing.  If anyone has the SUS book, 2nd edition, I encourage all to read it.

    Here, the Fraction defines things like "glory", "grace", and "love" all as coming from God's divinity, and through them, we are purified, sanctified, and united with the Trinity.

    Here's a snippet in the middle of the Fraction that struck me the most:

    Manifest in the souls of Your servants the glory of Your life-giving mysteries.

    At the offering of the sacrifice upon the altar, sin shall cease from our members through Your grace.

    When Your glory comes down upon Your Mysteries, we lift our minds up to behold Your splendor.

    At the turning of the bread and wine into Your Body and Blood, our souls shall be turned unto fellowship with Your glory, and our souls shall be united to Your divinity.

    Create in us, O our Lord and our God, a pure heart, and let Your Spirit dwell within us.

  • bump  ;)
  • Mina,

    Christ is Risen!

    I realise that what I'm about to type does not add much to the discussion, but really: what is there left to say after the snippet you just included on your last post?

    Apophatic rhetoric aside, I'm quite awestruck myself; direct and to the heart of the matter - quite.

    ~m
  • [quote author=mourad link=topic=14279.msg164902#msg164902 date=1370023833]
    Mina,

    Christ is Risen!

    I realise that what I'm about to type does not add much to the discussion, but really: what is there left to say after the snippet you just included on your last post?

    Apophatic rhetoric aside, I'm quite awestruck myself; direct and to the heart of the matter - quite.

    ~m
    My original question was not answered. That's why I bumped it.
  • Any word on the origin of this fraction yet? ;)
  • Bump bump
  • Thanks for the bump :)


Memorial for HH Pope Shenouda

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